I have to replace the starboard engine in my 1980 Commander (410). It has overheated and seized up. I'm looking at replacement long blocks to buy and swap out. Any experience out there with companies that supply these, bolt-up differences, "replacement" vs "remanufactured", specific characteristics like configuration of rear main, types of gaskets etc. Also - I'm looking at getting the new long block into the cabin through the door or window with a hoist. Anyone done this? Thanks in advance for your ideas!

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GM used to sell new crate motors. I do not know if they still do. They were a great deal. Summit and Jeggs both carry the crate motors. They do say not for marine use, but if you change the freeze plugs and bolt the marine accessories on, my experience is they work fine. Just be sure the torque and HP specs meet your requirements at the desired RPM.

Hi Paul,

The last time I overhauled a 454.  I disassembled my engine hoist and reassembled it inside the cabin.

I pulled the heads etc. I replaced the floor except for one cover. I pulled the engine up to cabin level.

Replaced the floor board.  Rolled the engine and stuck it out the door on the hoist.  Used the yard arm

that the marina uses for sailboat unloading to pull it off of the boat and into the back of my pickup.

Important fact! The short block weighs much less than the complete engine.  No heads, no manifolds, etc

Good luck!

Pat 

 I had the misfortune of a rod going thru the side of Crusader 454 (1976) last summer. After shopping all the boatyards that I give a lot of business too wanted 8200---12000 to do the job on my 1967-42 aft cabin commander. I went thru this 14-yrs ago on my port engine when a harmonic balancer "un-glued" throwing the timing off blowing 4-portside pistons. I found a great mechanic, who brought a "a-frame" with a comealong. He and his helper had the long block up onto my salon floor in 4-hours, a week later I took it over to a crane next door at the longtime crusader dealer. They have a nice "L--hook" that come into the salon door and out the wounded engine came. I had it taken to a great machine shop in Portland that fully overhauled it, bored 30-over, new rods with arp-nuts and locks, str. the crank, new harmonic balancer, welded the cast oil pan, lots of new parts, balanced, dyno'd, and delivered back to the crane dock for 2,900. for the machine shop work. They do classic cars, hotrods, RV's and boats------great work, they did my port engine in 2002. Craned back to the boat salon. back into the bilge with new hoses, impeller,and all together by Turkey day. Runs perfect-----both pull 4300 rpm upstream with 22 by 23--4-blades with full fuel and water. The whole production cost 6200.  Same thing on the port in 2002 cost 3100. I run Valvoline 30w offroad racing oil which has a nice zinc load to protect the flat tappet cam and lifters in this early gen 454. I sold a 41- Com flush deck a few years back------you might get the short block out the back door on a frigerator dolly----I helped a friend do this on a carver aft with small blocks. The other option is what Chris Craft calls a "Fiddley" hatch. The blueprints came with my Commander showing you where to cut the roof over the salon. On the big Connie the cut line is covered by a T moulding. The Maritime Museum prob. has a list of blueprints avail for your model and hull model for this same blueprint. Then you could crane in and crane out the entire engine as an assembly. Good luck on this project.  Bob Krause------chris craft boater since 1954.

I wonder if it will bolt up the same? All the aux pieces and fittings



Dick Morland said:

That's kind of what I was thinking. Will the new long block fit thru the cabin door?

Pat Stone said:

Hi Paul,

The last time I overhauled a 454.  I disassembled my engine hoist and reassembled it inside the cabin.

I pulled the heads etc. I replaced the floor except for one cover. I pulled the engine up to cabin level.

Replaced the floor board.  Rolled the engine and stuck it out the door on the hoist.  Used the yard arm

that the marina uses for sailboat unloading to pull it off of the boat and into the back of my pickup.

Important fact! The short block weighs much less than the complete engine.  No heads, no manifolds, etc

Good luck!

Pat 

Sounds like an explosion! Will the new long block fit thru the door? I really hope I don't have to cut a hole in the top.

Bob Krause said:

 I had the misfortune of a rod going thru the side of Crusader 454 (1976) last summer. After shopping all the boatyards that I give a lot of business too wanted 8200---12000 to do the job on my 1967-42 aft cabin commander. I went thru this 14-yrs ago on my port engine when a harmonic balancer "un-glued" throwing the timing off blowing 4-portside pistons. I found a great mechanic, who brought a "a-frame" with a comealong. He and his helper had the long block up onto my salon floor in 4-hours, a week later I took it over to a crane next door at the longtime crusader dealer. They have a nice "L--hook" that come into the salon door and out the wounded engine came. I had it taken to a great machine shop in Portland that fully overhauled it, bored 30-over, new rods with arp-nuts and locks, str. the crank, new harmonic balancer, welded the cast oil pan, lots of new parts, balanced, dyno'd, and delivered back to the crane dock for 2,900. for the machine shop work. They do classic cars, hotrods, RV's and boats------great work, they did my port engine in 2002. Craned back to the boat salon. back into the bilge with new hoses, impeller,and all together by Turkey day. Runs perfect-----both pull 4300 rpm upstream with 22 by 23--4-blades with full fuel and water. The whole production cost 6200.  Same thing on the port in 2002 cost 3100. I run Valvoline 30w offroad racing oil which has a nice zinc load to protect the flat tappet cam and lifters in this early gen 454. I sold a 41- Com flush deck a few years back------you might get the short block out the back door on a frigerator dolly----I helped a friend do this on a carver aft with small blocks. The other option is what Chris Craft calls a "Fiddley" hatch. The blueprints came with my Commander showing you where to cut the roof over the salon. On the big Connie the cut line is covered by a T moulding. The Maritime Museum prob. has a list of blueprints avail for your model and hull model for this same blueprint. Then you could crane in and crane out the entire engine as an assembly. Good luck on this project.  Bob Krause------chris craft boater since 1954.

If your old long block comes out, the new one will go in.

The intake manifold on new long blocks are different bolt patterns than the old ones.

Be sure and check this out.  

Pat

Measure the doorway of your 410----then measure a 454 shortblock at a machine shop. You might be surprised.  A lot of marine shops and boatyards in my area go with a rebuilt longblock from a few production engine builders, because of the nice markup they charge a customer, and of course the wait at a good machine shop. I waited a month in the fall but well worth it with a year warranty. But back to your situation. either tear down to short block and out the door. Cut the roof----or complete shortblock down the stairs. My side door is 24.5" wide----longblock just made it thru.  Best of luck.

You sure they changed the intake design on the Big Block? My understanding was that the 454 only got a roller cam and better EFI when they applied the Vortec badge.

There are however at least 3 different cyl head designs, Oval Port, Square Port, and Peanut Port.

I will admit though I am not as framilliar with the big block as the small blocks. Even though my pickup has one I've never tore into it.

Pat Stone said:

If your old long block comes out, the new one will go in.

The intake manifold on new long blocks are different bolt patterns than the old ones.

Be sure and check this out.  

Pat

I am not sure that the intake was redesigned on the big block, but if the heads have different ports, stands to reason that the intake would need to match up.

Thanks,

Pat

My port engine was overheating. Close cooling , problem solved.  The tru,hull raw water inlet was clogged about the size of a nail head. Was all the opening I had  hard plaque build up,once clean opening is  one inch overheating solved..

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