In my area our boats are in water year around so when we pull and get the bottoms painted it is with a multi-year paint.  Many/all of these recommend launching within some short period and provide no assurance of  functionality if pulled and allowed to dry.  I have not had this discussion with the Northern Brethren, those of the boats not exposed to Moma Nature 12 months per year, those with boats only half their age in the sun and weather, those whose bottoms dry as nearly many months as they are exposed to moisture, those whose boats are not exposed to salt water, Asian Carp impact, I digress.

Northereners (intentional spelling, I don't care what's suggested by compuspell, you know what I mean), what do you, pull your boat when the weather gets tough do about bottom paint, ignore the dry cautions, repaint, figure the seasons so short nothing will attach or repaint every year (I don't believe that)?

Tim of the boat that gets some bottom fix every 4 to 6 years.

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Tim,

What paints are you seeing that require launching while still wet? I don't see how you could do that without removing some of the paint where it contacts either the trailer or the lift.

I sanded the old blue chalky ablative off and repainted with Pettit Hydrocoat (not chalky) last spring, plan to just do touchups before it goes back in the water this spring. If I were doing a multiyear launch, I'd have simply put more coats on.

Jim

My understanding is that the original old copper based red paints needed to be launched just as soon as possible after coating, preferably within hours or a day at most. As soon as it dried the copper started oxidizing and lost effectiveness. It wasn't uncommon to slap a coat of paint on the pad marks while the boat was in the hoist and wait 20-30 minutes, then splash the boat.

The modern "multi-seasonal" paints don't suffer from oxidation when on the hard. As long as there's color there's anti fouling. Hence, you can simply buff the chalky stuff off and touch up as needed and you're good to go. That's how I've been doing it up here in Wisconsin for many years, with good success.

Thanks Greg, this is just one of the niggling things in the back of my mind over the years.  I would not wish to spend the money on bottom paint and need to redo at relaunch.  It has been some time since I held the can in my hand at paint time!  Obviously, my question it was not recommended the paint was allowed to dry at any time of the paint protection life.  Another indication of old folk knowledge, don't know when that happened.

Tim

Greg nailed it. Today paints are available that don’t loose their effectiveness out of water. Mostly ablative paints. I put Pettit Hydrocoat on my Catalina, it was a nice paint to work with and after 3 seasons in and out of the water just needed some small touch ups.

My Commander has the standard chalky blue paint that Jim was talking about. My plan of attack with it has been contrary to the manufactures instructions but has been very effective. Instead of multiple layers of paint for multiple years I’ve been putting one very thinned down coat on each spring of the cheapest West Marine paint available. I get one coat per gallon of paint with a quart of mineral spirits added. Doesn’t seem to be building up too bad as by the end of the season I’m starting to see gel coat in places and I have zero growth on the bottom, came out looking as clean as it did when I put it in.

Eventually though I would like to go back to Copper Bronze and that will require a different approach. 

We paint every spring. Both boats I've owned came into my possession with VC-17 on their bottoms. From what I've read, nothing plays nice overtop of VC-17, so I've never thought about using anything else. There is no build up, as it wears away during our short season - I haven't checked the Commander after its first season, but imagine it will need a coat. 5 quarts does 1 coat.

As a service tech, I know all too well this conundrum.. (?sp) The ablative antifouling paints ( Interlux bottomkote, West Marine and the new water based paints) rely on water to keep them alive and allow their "shedding" ability to work as designed. Therefore it is noted that most ablative should not be out of water for a certain period of time, or they will "die off" peel, and flake. thus the reason most of my Northern boats (Maryland, NJ, and NY) boats use a "hard Shell" paint like Petit, or VC. The ones that use ablative, are pressurewashed, and overcoated each year before launch.  Hope this helps!

Lee

Good Morning Tim. Experience from the three stages of my Boating Life. Let me start by saying that my boats have all been birthed on the Charles River in Boston, so flushed with fresh/brackish water after every trip.

1) The first Chris Craft we had when I was a kid was a wooden Constellation, Followed by a wooden Cruiser Inc. These boats were pulled and painted every season and any bright-work with peeling varnish was stripped and varnished. Until I was about 12, I thought the "smell of the sea" WAS varnish. 

2) My first fiberglass boat was a Searay with an I/O. Because it was an I/O, it was also pulled every season. After a good pressure wash, she would sit and dry out for 5 months, and then get her bottom sanded and painted, every year. The trick was to sand down enough to prevent buildup of paint, but not down to the Fiberglass. My Father took care of this very simply, The first year we had the boat he had the hull soda blasted. He then applied a white bottom coat, followed by a blue anti-fouling coat. Subsequently, if you saw white while sanding, you moved on. 

3) Both my Luhrs and the current "Wanderer" have inboards. I "Wet Store" on the river and pull it every 4 years, or if it needs out of the water work. 

Tim

I work PT at West Marine, we recently began offering Sea hawk Bottom Paints.  A friend has used it on his 57 ft Sport Fish for quite a few years and swears by it.  Reviews I have read also give it very good ratings.  It also states that it is Multi season and does not lose effectiveness being out of the water.  I definitely plan on using the CUKOTE next time I do the bottom.  Their website offers a selection tool based on hull meterial region and personal preferences and it is offered in many colors.

https://www.seahawkpaints.com/product/cukote/

Rob, good to know.  Thanks for all the comments and suggestions.  Next round I will see if I can't get our yard into the current century.  Previous time I couldn't even get them to get the red I wanted, actually LIZ and I wanted, heard about that for several years.

Rob, looking at the website I don't think it is offered for us inland waterway folks.  This was the story I got from the local yard, the high copper paints are no longer permitted for pleasure boats on the inland waterways.  IDK

No restrictions in Michigan. You’re state may limit it but I don’t know of any blanket fresh water ban. 

Timothy "Tim" Miller said:

Rob, good to know.  Thanks for all the comments and suggestions.  Next round I will see if I can't get our yard into the current century.  Previous time I couldn't even get them to get the red I wanted, actually LIZ and I wanted, heard about that for several years.

Rob, looking at the website I don't think it is offered for us inland waterway folks.  This was the story I got from the local yard, the high copper paints are no longer permitted for pleasure boats on the inland waterways.  IDK

Tim

Sea Hawk Smart Solution is Metal Free Mission bays are Copper Free

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