Hello everyone.  I have been a long time lurker as a guest here and just this weekend decided to take the plunge, come out from behind the shadows and create an actual user account.

The information available in all facets of this website is extremely useful and I thank all of those who have contributed to the aggregate.

A bit about me: I grew up in a coastal town in New England and spent a great deal of my youth surrounded by boats.  Fast forward 30 years, I have a wonderful wife, and two small children (7 and 4).  Over the last several years we toyed with the idea of a vacation home by the beach.  Here in New England, that means a cuboidal residency in a glorified tenement building for half a million bucks.

This time last year we decided the boating life was for us.  While a boat could cost half a million bucks if we buy the wrong one, I'll take that any day over buying an apartment 3 blocks from the beach.

We have unanimously fallen in love with the Commander 47.  We have been searching the usual haunts (YachtWorld, BoatTrader, Craigslist and local marinas (before the COVID-19 restrictions).  What we are finding is a very wide swing in asking prices.  Now before I get flamed, I understand pricing follows condition (in most cases), so a vessel that is half-sunk in the harbor will likely have a favorable asking price to another that is a showpiece.  However, what I am seeing is a swing from around $25K to $125K for Commander 45/47s out there.  

I guess my real question, again I know value is a subjective thing, where is the market on these boats right now?  What is the market doing amidst the pandemic?  Any insight would be great, and I thank you all in advance.

John

 

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Hi John,

The solenoids I think you are referring to, control voltage to breakers in the dc panel. Those breakers control power to among others the switches that start the motors. Red hot is not something the solenoids would normally do if they were working properly. They do get warm though. I hope this is your problem. A grand sound like a lot to change out two solenoids 

Good luck,

Billy K.

Captain  John  ..........  Be sure to have your engine service guy read the battery charging voltage with a voltmeter at the battery terminals while idleing dockside  .  The helm gauge will not show exact charging voltage .

Tim

Thanks for the info guys. I guess the solenoids are deep in the helm so access is difficult. I am happy to not have to do the job myself!
As long as the sea trial is successful then I’ll take it. The present owner (selling through a broker) is probably expecting a big list of concessions following the survey report, but I assured the broker that I don’t expect everything to be as new on 50 year old vessel. Of course the broker is like “I have backup offers if you want to back out...blah, blah,blah”. I quietly responded and said “I’m the guy under contract. I’m the guy with the cash. I don’t care about the other interested parties and neither should you.” Sure I may sound coy, but I run my business the same way. I sold one of the cars out of my collection last month to the party with the lowest offer. Why? Because I talked to the guy, and he reminded me of myself. Sure I could have made a few thousand more by going with the high offer, but I could tell after one phone call that it was to be the hardest few thousand Ive made in a while.... The moral of the story (for the seller anyways) is that in most cases the first offer is the best offer and there is no substitution for an even-keeled, qualified buyer!

Here's a photo of her in the water for the first time in 2 years.  I snapped it during the first part of the survey.

How cool John!  She looks happy to be afloat!

Hey John,

It's been a while, how did the sea trial go? 

-Don

John Mario said:

Thanks for the info guys. I guess the solenoids are deep in the helm so access is difficult. I am happy to not have to do the job myself!
As long as the sea trial is successful then I’ll take it. The present owner (selling through a broker) is probably expecting a big list of concessions following the survey report, but I assured the broker that I don’t expect everything to be as new on 50 year old vessel. Of course the broker is like “I have backup offers if you want to back out...blah, blah,blah”. I quietly responded and said “I’m the guy under contract. I’m the guy with the cash. I don’t care about the other interested parties and neither should you.” Sure I may sound coy, but I run my business the same way. I sold one of the cars out of my collection last month to the party with the lowest offer. Why? Because I talked to the guy, and he reminded me of myself. Sure I could have made a few thousand more by going with the high offer, but I could tell after one phone call that it was to be the hardest few thousand Ive made in a while.... The moral of the story (for the seller anyways) is that in most cases the first offer is the best offer and there is no substitution for an even-keeled, qualified buyer!

Hi Don,

I bought her!



Don Post said:

Hey John,

It's been a while, how did the sea trial go? 

-Don

John Mario said:

Thanks for the info guys. I guess the solenoids are deep in the helm so access is difficult. I am happy to not have to do the job myself!
As long as the sea trial is successful then I’ll take it. The present owner (selling through a broker) is probably expecting a big list of concessions following the survey report, but I assured the broker that I don’t expect everything to be as new on 50 year old vessel. Of course the broker is like “I have backup offers if you want to back out...blah, blah,blah”. I quietly responded and said “I’m the guy under contract. I’m the guy with the cash. I don’t care about the other interested parties and neither should you.” Sure I may sound coy, but I run my business the same way. I sold one of the cars out of my collection last month to the party with the lowest offer. Why? Because I talked to the guy, and he reminded me of myself. Sure I could have made a few thousand more by going with the high offer, but I could tell after one phone call that it was to be the hardest few thousand Ive made in a while.... The moral of the story (for the seller anyways) is that in most cases the first offer is the best offer and there is no substitution for an even-keeled, qualified buyer!

Congrats!,  the sound is a great boating location!

Hi John,

like you, my wife and I have decided to get into boating and the Chris Craft bug bit me early. I really enjoyed the posts documenting how you found your 41'. I can't see the original listing now so I was wondering what the original asking price was? If you wouldn't mind sharing, the final cost would help me get a gauge of the market, like you were searching for in the original post.

Congrats and happy cruising!

Drew

Hi Drew! I will first give some unsolicited advice: Ask a lot of questions! I scoured this forum and the library sections and learned as much as I could about these boats before I looked at my first one. Many of the members here are a wealth of knowledge and are always willing to help.

La Mer, our 1972 41 is in extremely good, original shape. With that said, original is not always best. A t 50 years old, any semi-mass-produced boat is way past it’s intended life expectancy. Now that I have you totally scared, I’ll add that these boats, under the right owner can thrive in their golden years. Each one tells a story. Ours was in even better shape before it was left derelict on the hard uncovered for 2 years. Knowing she made the 900 mile trip from Lake Erie in 2018 made me feel that the systems were serviceable. The owner we bought from purchased it from the previous owner who actually made the trip and I was able to contact him and get a complete history of the boat - invaluable.

Now to your questions: the boat was listed for $39,900. We offered $30k and settled at $32k. This left us $8k or our $40k budget in the kitty for service items. So far we are about $1k into new batteries, tune-ups and forward head replacement. I feel we got a very good deal. We wanted something that we could pay cash for and if the kids hated it or we simply had enough of it, we could always sell, free and clear, even at a loss. The thought of starting a family tradition with a $100k boat with a loan absolutely horrified us. Not to mention, $100k 40’+ “modern” boat is still going to be 15 or 20 years old, likely of poorer quality than a CCC and have all the same problems but are much more complex (and expensive). I look at our CCC like an old car - so the carburetors need a few pumps to start and the steering is a bit stiff. I’ll take that over calling a Cat technician out to plug in his laptop for $120/hr into my twin-turbo diesels only to tell me I need to spend another $3k on a thingamajig module if I want to go cruising this weekend.

The moral of my rant is that it pays to buy one of these in good shape. The difference between a temping $20k CCC and a $40k CCC is HUGE. Also it pays to be a DIYer. My wife and I aren’t rich, but being handy with an engineering background enables me to do all of the maintenance which keeps operating costs down. Most of all, remember, boating is supposed to be fun!

Great advice John. Each one is different.  Each one has had a different history.  As always,  buy the nicest one you can find.  It will save you thousands in the longrun.

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