What are the pro/cons of using this style valve on the fuel tank:

versus a traditional ball valve?

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As long as the valve is rated for use in fuel lines, the choice would be dictated by the application. I used the smaller thumb valves when I redid the fuel lines on my Luhrs due to space constraints. They are also convenient when installing a shutoff in an unsupported fuel line.

On Wanderer, the tanks feed into a manifold mounted on the aft bulkhead that consists of five 1/4 turn valves, three t's, and some connective fittings. This allows me to isolate either tank, or turn fuel off to port or starboard engine or the jenny. It also makes for even fuel consumption from both tanks. 

The groco valve is Far superior to the other style.

We've  used many of the other ones and while they do the job they have some disadvantages

For example if you buy 1/2" in either version the groco is a true 1/2" internally as its concidered a full flow valve while the other brass valve will likely be something like 3/16 internally even though it can screw onto 1/2 pipe. 

The groco valve easily can be mounted to a boats structure where the other style has no means of being fastened other than its own pipe thread which acording to abyc is not advisable

From a cost standpoint the groco is barely more expensive than its counterpart but yet a far better valve.

Helpful guys - thanks.

Jeremy - you confirmed one of my fears, especially as there is a reducing coupler on my current set-up (between the pick-up and one of those thumb valves). Certainly not helping my effort to alleviate fuel flow issues to the 427’s.

Glad I don't have fuel flow issues, I like big lumps of torquey low rpm diesel iron.

That being said, full port UL listed valves are the way to go for max flow through a supposedly standard pipe size.  You will certainly be happy with the Groco valves.  You might be happy with the other valves

Fuel valves in newer boats need an independent means of support. That's why the 1/4 turn valves have mounting feet. I don't know if the standard applies to new installation on old boats when done by the owner. Marine stores are still selling the old in-line valves. If the work were being done by a marina they might have to upgrade the valve.

Remember to use yellow Teflon tape, the white stuff is not fuel rated. 

Thanks Nat. It’s like a rubics cube of standards between where to mount the shut-off and anti-siphon valves. I’m probably obsessing over details, but I want it done right and not looking like some sort of science experiment.  

Found this last night, might see if these will work. Figure it checks both the “shut off has to be mounted” and the “anti-siphon as close to the tank as possible” standards. I’ll mount this to the pick-up, then anti-siphon directly to the anti-siphon. Groco says to use the brass version for fiberglass tanks and this stainless version for stainless or steel tanks.

Its true that old boats being restored / updated do not need to follow the stricter saftey rules of newly built boats. However in a lot of cases those rules have been made based on problems and failures encountered with some of the ways of the past so its just good practice to incorporate these things into older boats in the name of safety.

Matt:

stainless is rarely used in the construction of large  fuel tanks as is was deemed too brittle with a higher posibility of rupturing.

No harm in using stainless , brass or bronze valves in a fuel system. 

For all of my diesel work I use Rectorseal Tru Blu.  Never an issue.  It is Gasoline rated.  Data sheet PDF attached below.

Attachments:

I think groco is considering galvanic corrosion between dissimilar metals when they recommend using stainless valves on stainless tanks. While we think of this in under water applications, those of in in damp salt air will see this happen to a lesser extent above the waterline. 

It would probably take a few years for this to affect our fuel system, but considering how long we keep these boats...

I thought High Tack was the suggested sealant at fuel connections? That’s what I’ve always used in the past. 

Nat Brady said:

Fuel valves in newer boats need an independent means of support. That's why the 1/4 turn valves have mounting feet. I don't know if the standard applies to new installation on old boats when done by the owner. Marine stores are still selling the old in-line valves. If the work were being done by a marina they might have to upgrade the valve.

Remember to use yellow Teflon tape, the white stuff is not fuel rated. 

Permatex no 2 is what I prefer

Trying to post a picture of the manifold on Wanderer's fuel lines. 

In photo below, left and right valves go to port and starboard fuel tanks, center valve can be used in conjunction with either left or right to shut off fuel to port or starboard engine. Lower valve goes to generator.

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