The deteriorating gas tanks have been removed  and the straps that secure them were mostly completely rusted thru.  The muflers are going to be replaced as they have rusted thru also.

There was a dangerous situation in the exhaust system where the 4.5" dia exhaust coming from the copper engine collectors needed to be reduced to the 4"dia. Coper pipe going back to the mufflers 

 There was auctually steel welded to the end of the copper pipe for the reduction which seems crazy to me that chris craft could have chose  to use dissimilar metals. When I dismantled this area it became apparent  that a rusty slury had been leaking in this area for many years but went unnoticed being hidden outboard of the gas tanks which are now removed. After speaking with Tim Toth today it sounds like he also has this same exact reduction in his otherwise copper exhaust system.

The 427 are also getting some much needed  work. The intakes will be replaced as there are holes in them. All the  hoses and seals , half of the engine mount bolts were either rusted completely thru or broken so they will get replaced along with a few engine mounts which became fused to the broken mount bolts with years of water dripping on them.  Because of the broken mount bolts and rusted out lags the hold the additional Douglass fir engine beds I will also be replacing the wobbly  engine beds as needed to assure that there is a solid engine mountig surface. While the engines are apart  everything will be inspected and adressed as needed as well.

Brand new tanks and fuel lines will be going in 

All new wire harness to the engines and all 12 volt wireing in the dash.

The helm is also gettig an overhaul repairing the stress cracks, restoring the gauges, replacing the switches and getting rid of all the extra holes that have been added over the years. 

Needless to say ill have to sleep sometime next summer as i work on customers boats all day at work and then for "fun" im working on my commander most  nights and weekends

As this is a rather monumental side project 

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thanks for the note! They really are the best looking boats in any marina.  How fare along are with your project? I've really been enjoying the photos of your progress

JFK

Paul Cavenaugh said:

50 years ago, fiberglass boat building was far from an exact science.  Chris Craft Commanders were amongst the best.  It would be interesting to follow your costs, even with your exceptional knowledge and talents. (Remember to price yourself at $150 an hour).  It would be a true representation of what a "keel-up" restoration really costs.  If built today, a New 35 Commander would price out around $650,000.

There is nothing wrong with owning the coolest boat in the marina!       

The heavy glass work in the engine compartment is mostly all done now. I still need to address a handfull of issues in the bilge fwd of the main bulkhead.

Im hoping to complete all the bottom repairs in the comming weeks. 

Theres a handfull of little things (and that list is rather long) before I can begin to  start working on systems. 

That's really cool stuff - I enjoy watchig the progress

JFK



Jeremy Goldstein said:

The heavy glass work in the engine compartment is mostly all done now. I still need to address a handfull of issues in the bilge fwd of the main bulkhead.

Im hoping to complete all the bottom repairs in the comming weeks. 

Theres a handfull of little things (and that list is rather long) before I can begin to  start working on systems. 

Well the glass work on the port side bottom is just about done

Heres how the shaft log on that side  looks now after many new layers of glass about 1.5" thick.

IT still needs to be faired out a bit but first I started working  on the blister and glass repairs on the Stbd. and  my boat is still presenting me with more exciteing problems to fix .

The starbord shaft log  , which I knew had some bit of delamination as It could be heard with light percussion ended up opening up into a mess simular  to the port side shaft only much worse. 

The large void in the photo with my finger in it filled with water and sludge and is located at the frintvof the shaft log just before it pops out inside the bilge. The failed poly filler from the factory had failed,  allowing water and gunk to come in both from the bilge and from the lake.

The second hole with sludge oozing out is coming from the inside of the box frame that crosses over the shaft log on the inside of the hull. 

Fiberglass is amazing.  It leaves a historic view of what happened with any boat at any day and time regarding conditions and talent of the person building the boat. I'm also into the offshore powerboats that have extensive attention to detail. I was talking to a guy rebuilding an old racing boat and he found a quarter and 2 pennies from the year it was built glassed into an area of the hull that no one would ever see unless rebuilding the boat. It was a 27 ft boat hence the 27 cents. this person was not in a rush for sure. I cant think of a better way to show your customers your talent than keeping a diary of this rebuild process. Maybe a glassed in business card or some type of icon would be appropriate on your build?.

Paul, funny you mention about things getting glassed into the hull. Over the years  I've found coins, papers, hardware , gloves, razor blades, and even French fries. In my commander there is still a big pile of fender washers that must have fell out of the pocket of one of the Chris Craft workers   that is glassed into the inside of my keel. I also found one of the original manufacturers labels from the place that supplied the rolls of fiberglass to Chris Craft .


 
Paul Tuomi said:

Fiberglass is amazing.  It leaves a historic view of what happened with any boat at any day and time regarding conditions and talent of the person building the boat. I'm also into the offshore powerboats that have extensive attention to detail. I was talking to a guy rebuilding an old racing boat and he found a quarter and 2 pennies from the year it was built glassed into an area of the hull that no one would ever see unless rebuilding the boat. It was a 27 ft boat hence the 27 cents. this person was not in a rush for sure. I cant think of a better way to show your customers your talent than keeping a diary of this rebuild process. Maybe a glassed in business card or some type of icon would be appropriate on your build?.

It's been 4.5 months since my spine Injury and I am recently back at work full time  and also have been back  at my night shift job (my commander restoration )

I've spent pretty much most of my time this winter  on some very extensive bottom repairs which I'm happy to say are nearly complete. 

I finished a total reconstruction of the area around the starboard shaft log. This was extreamly time consuming but is now constructed of 100% solid glass.

I then had to deal with some rather large factory voids in the keel which were also filled with water. They were found with percussion testing just about every square inch of the bottom.

Then lots of additional blister repairs, other random gouges , voids, and removal/ glassing in of nine extra unnecessary thru hulls followed by a thorough and muscle aching complete fairing of the bottom surface. 

In preparation for applying a new boot stripe I buffed the hull with an aggressive tooling  compound designed to prep boat molds in between laying up hulls in order to get a true read on my boat's gel cote color to match so I could repair some minor chips and stress cracks near the area just above where the boot stripe goes. I wanted to get these minor repairs done before shooting  the stripe so as to not damage the new stripe if done at a later point in time.

Next I removed the swim platform in order to make repairs to the transom.

I discovered that when the platform was originally installed , the pilot holes that were drilled for the mounting hardware were too small which caused the glass to delaminate around every screw. This led to me grinding out every one of them and building  up fresh FRP to restore strength in these areas 

Once the transom is ready I'll finally be ready to shoot my new boot stripe.

I've mentioned this on several posts but, in case you missed it. LESTOIL on the bilge. You'll be amazed!

I'll have to try it on one of my upcoming restorations. 

Thankfully I'm way past scrubbing the bilge of this boat

Tom Stawarz said:

I've mentioned this on several posts but, in case you missed it. LESTOIL on the bilge. You'll be amazed!

Wow Jeremy... great pictures, and amazing work that you're doing on your 35.  Keep posting about the adventure...

Nice work Jeremy.  Totally enjoy following your progress. 

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