I'm hoping to get started on my new boat this coming week.  It is six hours away, I'll bring a lot of tools, but wondering if I need anything special to get the shafts out of the couplers?  I had to turn down a socket and make a holding tool on my last boat. 

This boat is all original, and I need to cross Lake Michigan after launch to bring it home.  All critical rubber parts need to be replaced, my friend who restores boats professionally reminded me the shaft logs too.  I'd like to replace the packings with a dripless shaft seals while it is apart.  I'll have to see if there is room, and if the shaft is clean enough for a lip seal.

I'd also like to know how much coolant is in these freshwater systems, I'll need to drain both engines to replace all the hoses, and should really put fresh coolant in anyway.

I'm trying to hold off with questions until I get the Super Disk and Resource Collection, they are ordered, might have a lot of info I need.

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If your already going thru the trouble of replacing your shaft  packings I'd recommend removing the shafts and props and have them reconditioned and balanced. 

A prop shaft that is not true will prematurely wear out packings and make for undesirable vibration. 

Plus its nice piece of mind  starting off on a new to you boat with all running gear in proper order

If it is  fresh  water  cooled there is no coolant, the files  section  will  help  with  many  of  your  questions.  I  am  not  sure  there's  space  for  dripless, I would  check  the  packing, determine  the  size, have  that on hand, do a 30 minute run, if necessary  at idle  while  moored to see if  all is well or additional  packing is needed.

Getting  the  shafts  out  of  the  couplers  is difficult.  I  found  the  easiest  way  was  to use  longer  bolts, separate  the coupler, put a socket or nut slighty smaller than the  shaft  diameter, between the flanges and use  this  to  press the  shaft  out.

  See Morland  and my recommendation  for  couplers.

Sorry, I meant fresh water cooling, as opposed to sea water cooling.  The engines run coolant through a heat exchanger.

I've never messed with replacing packing, my last boat had Tides dripless seals, and I liked how they worked.  Packing is certainly more durable and safe, but the wet bilge.  I pulled the shafts on that boat to add spare seals, sounds like similar deal using long bolts and a socket to push the shaft out of the coupler.  Guess I'll have to get familiar with the hardware store in Sturgeon Bay to put something together.

500 hours on the packing, not sure if it has been replaced in 45 years though, like everything on the boat.  I know it was well maintained.  Rudder and trim-tab packing also will have to be looked at.

Thanks

Timothy "Tim" Miller said:

If it is  fresh  water  cooled there is no coolant, the files  section  will  help  with  many  of  your  questions.  I  am  not  sure  there's  space  for  dripless, I would  check  the  packing, determine  the  size, have  that on hand, do a 30 minute run, if necessary  at idle  while  moored to see if  all is well or additional  packing is needed.

Getting  the  shafts  out  of  the  couplers  is difficult.  I  found  the  easiest  way  was  to use  longer  bolts, separate  the coupler, put a socket or nut slighty smaller than the  shaft  diameter, between the flanges and use  this  to  press the  shaft  out.

  See Morland  and my recommendation  for  couplers.

Good idea, I don't mind the expense of doing things right on this boat.  But, this boat has been treated super gently and excessively maintained by a Chris Craft dealer, like a museum piece.  Not much needs attention.  He obviously loved this boat, it is impeccable and factory original, I'm slightly terrified about putting the first scuff anywhere on it.  When we looked at it, the broker mentioned the props are still sharp and clean like they just came from the shop.  We were both amazed, the whole boat looks like it just came from the factory yesterday, hardly looks like it has been in the water.  I showed pictures of the bilge to a guy who worked at the factory when it was made, he said it looks like it just came out of the mold.

I want to start a separate thread about this boat, but it is surreal to look at, to open hatches and cupboards, and it is a brand-new 45-yr-old boat.  I was dazzled by the spotless bilge, I grew up cleaning big boats, and this was just stunning to me, I should have taken more pictures.  It has to be the only one like this in the world.  Not really a barn-find, as it apparently isn't historically valuable, but a time-capsule for sure.

I'm told it was the second-to-last 31' off the line here in Holland, maybe the second-to-last Sports Express?  Purchased by John Thenell, who owned marinas and a CC dealership in Sturgeon Bay.  I talked to a Captain in Florida I know about it, he knows people in Sturgeon Bay who knew John and know this boat well, although it has been in storage the past 8+ years.

Jeremy Goldstein said:

If your already going thru the trouble of replacing your shaft  packings I'd recommend removing the shafts and props and have them reconditioned and balanced. 

A prop shaft that is not true will prematurely wear out packings and make for undesirable vibration. 

Plus its nice piece of mind  starting off on a new to you boat with all running gear in proper order

I remember seeing John cleaning it back about 2004. at that time we kept Punchlist at same marina. Where are you taking it. I would not worry about shaft logs just repack good proven system.

Good luck

John & Sandy

The modern dripless packings use a face seal not a lip seal. Your critical measurements will be the shaft size of course but also the size of the fiberglass shaft log tube so you can get the correct size dripless to fit it, and make sure you will have enough room between the flange and the shaft log tube to fit the new dripless in

I'll be bringing it to Holland where it was built.  Plenty of resources around here to help me learn to care for it.  Cool that you saw John cleaning it, wish I could have met him.

Yes, probably best to put the stuffing box back on.  Newer-tech cords will make it easier for a nube like me to maintain it.

John W Even said:

I remember seeing John cleaning it back about 2004. at that time we kept Punchlist at same marina. Where are you taking it. I would not worry about shaft logs just repack good proven system.

Good luck

John & Sandy

Most dripless seals are face seal, except Tides, which uses a rubber lip seal.  It is the same seal used for crankshafts and camshafts, pumps, all kinds of machinery.  That was what I had on my last boat, worked well.  But even on that boat, the bilge was never really dry, always something getting in there from a heavy rain or overflowing shower/AC sump, or something.

chris said:

The modern dripless packings use a face seal not a lip seal. Your critical measurements will be the shaft size of course but also the size of the fiberglass shaft log tube so you can get the correct size dripless to fit it, and make sure you will have enough room between the flange and the shaft log tube to fit the new dripless in

Was it in the water?  I wonder if he used a dry slip or in/out service, as opposed to slipping it?  I don't know how else it can still be this clean with 500-hours on the engines.

John W Even said:

I remember seeing John cleaning it back about 2004. at that time we kept Punchlist at same marina. Where are you taking it. I would not worry about shaft logs just repack good proven system.

Good luck

John & Sandy

It was in the fall he was cleaning up to put away. He was a winter skier hence the name.

Punchlist 1979 42 Sport Fish 

Rats, only three inches clearance after pulling the coupler apart, I'll need to pull props, which I didn't bring tools for.  Training all next month, this might have to wait until spring to start multiple projects.  But the engines did turn over by hand after spraying PB Blaster (and the spray straw) into the cylinders.  Last oil change 16 years ago, this one has been waiting a long time.

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